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  • Things that exist: Bulgarian culture, Spanish culture, Canadian culture, Ukrainian culture, Swedish culture, Dutch culture, Basque culture, Austrian culture, French culture, Portuguese culture, Bosnian culture, Irish culture
  • Things that do not exist: "White culture"
  • Things that exist: Honduran culture, Indian culture, Japanese culture, Mongolian culture, Venezuelan culture, Moroccan culture, Egyptian culture, Iraqi culture, Cherokee culture, Jamaican culture, Korean culture, Bangladeshi culture, Shoshone culture
  • Things that do not exist: "PoC culture"
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italianartsociety:

Italian Baroque master Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio was likely born on this day in 1571. Scholars agree that he was born in the fall of this year, and it is likely that 29 September — feast day of St. Michael the Archangel, his namesake — was his birthday.

A highly original and influential artist, Caravaggio is one of the best known and most loved of the Italian Baroque painters. His name derives from his birthplace near Milan, but he spent the majority of his life in central and southern Italy. Upon his arrival in Rome at about age 17, Caravaggio began his career in the studio of Cavaliere d’Arpino painting copies, still lifes, and secular works. His naturalism caught the attention of high-ranking ecclesiastical patrons and led to important commissions including the Contarelli chapel in S. Luigi dei Francesi and the Cerasi chapel in Sta Maria del Popolo, after which he concentrated on large-scale religious paintings. Equally famous for his turbulent and scandalous private life, Caravaggio fled Rome after killing an adversary in a brawl over a bet. He was able to continue his career in Naples, Sicily, and Malta. Though he had no students, numerous European artists from Spain to Holland, known collectively as the ‘Caravaggisti,’ emulated his dramatic use of lights and darks known as tenebrism.

Long reputed to have died in July 1610 from fever resulting from his wild lifestyle, recent research suggests lead paint may have been the culprit.

Reference: John Gash. “Caravaggio, Michelangelo Merisi da.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T013950>.

Further reading: Caravaggio by Catherine Puglisi (2000); Caravaggio: A Life Sacred and Profane by Andrew Graham-Dixon (2011).

Fortune Teller, oil on canvas, ca. 1594-5 (Rome, Musei Capitolini)

Basket of Fruit, oil on canvas, c. 1598–1601 (Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana); Photo credit: Scala/Art Resource, NY

Calling of St. Matthew, c. 1599-1600 (Rome, S. Luigi dei Francesi, Contarelli Chapel)

Entombment, oil on canvas, 1603–4 (Rome, Pinacoteca Vaticana); photo credit: Scala/Art Resource, NY

Denial of St. Peter, oil on canvas, ca. 1610 (New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Herman and Lila Shickman, and Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift, 1997)

Crucifixion of St. Andrew, oil on canvas, 1606-7 (Cleveland Museum of Art)

Ottavio Leoni, Portrait of Caravaggio, ca. 1621. Florence: Biblioteca Marucelliana.

(via electricalice)

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ecunderbase:

thinking of your OTP like

image

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Tags: PRECISELY
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fuckindiva:

Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg

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pokotopokoto:

The breakfast club (il circolo della colazione)

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hesperida:

Dante and Virgil in the Ninth Circle of Hell
Oil on canvas (detail)
Gustave Doré - 1861

hesperida:

Dante and Virgil in the Ninth Circle of Hell

Oil on canvas (detail)

Gustave Doré - 1861

(Source: oldoils, via life-of-a-latin-student)

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CAPRA! CAPRA! CAPRA!

Poesia pura.

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i-accidently-everything:

Where is our god now….

Meanwhile Melkor: 

i-accidently-everything:

Where is our god now….

Meanwhile Melkor: 

(via masterofthefates)

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i lolled for sgarby

Leggere certe cose tira fuori lo Sgarbi che è in tutti noi.

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sillymarillion-comics replied to your post: sillymarillion-comics ha risposto al t…

ahahaha no tranquilla! cmq stà cosa mi mancava XD. Sinceramente non riesco a prenderla come un’offesa essere considerato PoC, anzi non riesco a prendere sul serio l’intera faccenda XDDD

Ma neanch’io, in realtà. All’inizio non mi dava per niente fastidio, lo consideravo solo un pò strano, visto che siamo uno dei maggiori esponenti della cultura cristiano-europea (in realtà, considero ancora tutta la dicotomia bianchi vs. PoC come poco pratica nel migliore dei casi, e del tutto insensata nel peggiore). Il momento in cui iniziano a girarti un pò i coglioni è quando tu vai lì, li correggi spiegandogli gentilmente che no, gli italiani non si identificano come PoC, e questi ti rispondono dandoti del “OMG WHITE SUPREMACIST!!!!1!!111” e continuano a sparare le loro stronzate, confermandoti che si, loro dell’ "errare humanum est, perseverare autem diabolicum" non hanno capito una minchia secca.